Recent Posts

Padma Lakshmi on How Her Indian Heritage Influenced Her Career

Padma Lakshmi on How Her Indian Heritage Influenced Her Career

Here’s how she turned challenges–like moving to a new country, struggling to lose weight, and battling endometriosis–into opportunities. PHOTO: FLICKR USER ELLEN WALLOP, ASIA SOCIETY   It’s easy to look at Padma Lakshmi and think, here is a person made for the spotlight. But for […]

Ode to the Wing

Ode to the Wing

New York’s Chicest Women-Only Club In a matter of months, The Wing already has a 3000-strong waiting list. (lead image credit: Harper’s Bazaar) The pastel-hued Wing. Photo: Supplied Late last year, after a decade trying to make it in New York’s hectic media world, with a weekly […]

Episode 94: Jami Attenberg On Being your Own Kind of Grown Up

Episode 94: Jami Attenberg On Being your Own Kind of Grown Up

Listen to Jami Attenberg HERE.

Jami Attenberg is the best! I’ve been waiting to have her back on the show ever since Emily and I interviewed her about her last book Saint Mazie. As you will hear, All Grown Up, knocked me about and triggered a lot, but in the very best heart-expanding, what-am-I-doing-with-my-life? way. If you’ve ever been single, infatuated, partnered up, in a weird, not-right relationship (this excludes no one)… if you love your mom so hard and in the same moment think she might be killing you with her emotions, this fantastic novel is for you. Jami’s protagonist Andrea is the hysterical truth-teller you’ve been looking for. Big revelations in this convo. I’m sure you’ll have some too if you listen up.

xox Angie

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Buy All Grown Up here. 

Jami Attenberg has written about sex, technology, design, books, television, and urban life for The New York Times Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, Lenny Letter and others. In March 2017, HMH Books will release her novel All Grown Up. It will also be published in the UK, Italy, Holland, Poland, France and Germany.

Her debut collection of stories, Instant Love, was published in 2006, followed by the novels The Kept Man and The Melting Season. Her fourth book, The Middlesteins, was published in October 2012. It appeared on The New York Times bestseller list, and was published in ten countries in 2013. It was also a finalist for both the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Fiction and the St. Francis College Literary Prize, and has been optioned by Showtime. A fifth book, Saint Mazie, was published in 2015 in the U.S. and the UK, and in Italy, France and Germany in 2016, and has been optioned by Fable Pictures. All Grown Up will be published in 2017 in the US and the UK, and in Italy, France, Germany, Holland, Poland and Turkey in 2017.

She divides her time between New Orleans, LA and Brooklyn, NY.

Episode 93: On the Korean Immigrant Experience in Japan

Episode 93: On the Korean Immigrant Experience in Japan

Listen to Jin Min Lee HERE.  I’m excited to celebrate International Women’s Day with my convo with writer Min Jin Lee, whose latest novel Pachinko is a stellar example of female resilience through the ages. Pachinko illuminates a period of history unknown to many of us – early […]

Episode 92: Daphne Merkin on Reckoning with Depression

Episode 92: Daphne Merkin on Reckoning with Depression

Listen to Daphne’s episode HERE. Daphne Merkin is one of my favorite people and she is hands down one of the best writers I’ve ever come across. This is one of my favorite episodes. Daphne is a former staff writer for The New Yorker and […]

Episode 91: Alana Massey on the Cult of Celebrity & Being a Winona Vs a Gwyneth

Episode 91: Alana Massey on the Cult of Celebrity & Being a Winona Vs a Gwyneth

Listen to Alana Massey and Payton Costell Turner HERE.

This week we bring you writer and cultural critic Alana Massey whose book of essays All The Lives I Want: Essays About My Best Friends Who Happen to be Strangers examines celebrity womanhood and how it shapes our lives. I enlisted the help of Payton Costell Turner, a multi-disciplinary artist, co-founder of the design studio Flat Vernacular and co-founder GAL (Girls at Library) to co-host this evocative discussion. This conversation was recorded live at the Wythe Hotel as part of the work x work ON AIR series, a pop up live streaming radio lounge that explores creativity and storytelling.

Please let us know what you think about this show @litupshow on Instagram and Twitter.

 xoxo Angie
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Image credit: Victor Jeffreys II.
Episode 90: Jennifer Wright on How Understanding Plagues Can Help Humanity

Episode 90: Jennifer Wright on How Understanding Plagues Can Help Humanity

Listen to JENNIFER WRIGHT HERE. I’ve wanted to have Jennifer Wright on the pod ever since I read her first book, It Ended Badly: Thirteen of the Worst Breakups in History. Jennifer has a rare ability to make history funny, titivating, and relevant, in way I’ve not […]

Episode 89: Ayelet Waldman on how Microdosing with LSD Changed Her Life

Episode 89: Ayelet Waldman on how Microdosing with LSD Changed Her Life

Listen to AYELET WALDMAN’S EPISODE HERE. This episode is sure to have you rethinking all you know about LSD and drugs in general. In her memoir, A Really Good Day – How Microdosing Made a Mega Difference in My Mood, My Marriage, and My Life, Ayelet […]

Episode 88: Patricia Bosworth on The Men in Her Life, Her Time at The Actors Studio & Tea with Audrey Hepburn & Givenchy

Episode 88: Patricia Bosworth on The Men in Her Life, Her Time at The Actors Studio & Tea with Audrey Hepburn & Givenchy

LISTEN TO PATRICIA’S EPIDOSE HERE.

Patricia Bosworth has written biographies about Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda and Diane Arbus, and now she applies her talents to her own fascinating life in her second memoir, The Men in My Life. The book chronicles Bosworth’s adolescence and sexual awakening, her foray into modeling for the likes of Arbus, as well as her time in Lee Strasberg’s Actors Studio, treading the boards alongside Steve McQueen, Paul Newman, and Marilyn Monroe. Before becoming a writer, she starred opposite Audrey Hepburn in the 1959 film The Nun’s Story, and the stories about her time shooting the film in Rome are gripping to say the least. All the glamour and excitement of this period is haunted by her brother and father’s suicide, and in this conversation Patricia opens up about what is like being a “suicide survivor” and how it irreversibly affected her life. I adored our time together and I hope you like listening to what became of it.

xoxo Angie

 

Buy The Men in My Life here.

Patricia Bosworth is an American journalist and biographer living in New York City. She is a contributing editor of Vanity Fair. A winner of the Front Page Award, she’s taught literary non-fiction at Columbia University’s School of Journalism and Barnard College. A long-time board member of the Actors Studio. She’s also the author of bestselling biographies of Montgomery Clift, Jane Fonda, Marlon Brando and the photographer Diane Arbus, the latter of which was made into the movie Fur starring Nicole Kidman and Robert Downey Jr. Her first memoir about her family and the Hollywood Blacklist is entitled Anything Your Little Heart Desires: An American Family Story. Her second memoir, entitled The Men in My Life: A Memoir of Love and Art in 1950’s Manhattan.

Ayelet Waldman’s Unusual “Trip” & Favorite Books Revealed

Ayelet Waldman’s Unusual “Trip” & Favorite Books Revealed

Upcoming Lit Up podcast guest Ayelet Waldman was featured in The Sunday Book Review in the New York Times sharing her favorite books. Next week she’ll be on the show to talk about her most recent book,  A Really Good Day about micro dosing with LSD. Illustration […]

My 5 Must-Read Books of FEB for Esquire

My 5 Must-Read Books of FEB for Esquire

Whether you prefer your reading sexy and satirical, political and polarizing or simply amusing, these stand-out books in February are guaranteed to hit the spot by providing some much-needed escapism, while challenging the status quo and sparking timely conversation. The Refugees by Viet Thanh Nguyen […]

Episode 87: Rachel Hulin on her Instagram novel “Hey Harry, Hey Matilda”

Episode 87: Rachel Hulin on her Instagram novel “Hey Harry, Hey Matilda”

LISTEN TO RACHEL HULIN’S EPISODE HERE.

This week’s episode with writer and photographer Rachel Hulin is the perfect antidote to these politically uncertain times–sometimes you simply need to sit down with a smart and lovely person and have a conversation that snaps you into the moment and leads to unexpected places.

As well as talking about Rachel’s witty and refreshing novel, Hey Harry, Hey Matilda, (about two, very funny, codependent twins searching for comfort and belonging), we also chat about hormone horoscopes, how her book grew out of a blog and into the first Instagram novel, and so much more. Rachel was a photo editor at Rolling Stone and one of her recent pieces for Salon, My year with Amy Winehouse: What I learned watching her through paparazzi lenses, draws on that time.

I hope you enjoy this conversation.

xoxo Angie

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Buy Hey Harry, Hey Matilda here.

Rachel Hulin is a photographer and writer. Her photographs have been shown at Jen Bekman Gallery, The Bronx Museum of the Arts, Wallspace Gallery, The New York Photo Festival, and ClampArt Gallery, where she is represented.

She’s worked as a photo editor at Rolling Stone, Radar Magazine, and Nerve.com. Her personal essays and art writing have appeared in Salon, The Daily Beast, The Photography Post, which she co-founded.

Her editorial photographs have appeared include The New York Times and The New Republic.  In 2013 she released a children’s book Flying Henry with an accompanying photo exhibit.

Episode 86: Roxane Gay on “Difficult Women”

Episode 86: Roxane Gay on “Difficult Women”

LISTEN TO ROXANE GAY HERE. I’ve read Roxane Gay’s work ever since I discovered her writing in grad school in 2010. Whenever there’s a huge cultural moment–a political catastrophe, an attack on Feminism, or breaking Channing Tatum news—I’m eager to see what she has to […]

Episode 85: Lucinda Rosenfeld on the Liberal Bubble, Education, and Class

Episode 85: Lucinda Rosenfeld on the Liberal Bubble, Education, and Class

Hello 2017! We are back with an exciting lineup for the year that will hopefully inspire, challenge, and provoke. LISTEN TO LUCINDA ROSENFELD HERE. This week Lucinda Rosenfeld talks about her most recent novel “Class.” The novel is as provocative as the title suggests. It’s […]

Episode 84: Julia Baird on the Real Queen Victoria

Episode 84: Julia Baird on the Real Queen Victoria

Listen to Julia Baird HERE.

I’ve been following author, broadcaster, journalist, and fellow Australian Julia Baird for more than a decade. In fact, I’ve been lurking around waiting for an opportunity to speak with her because I admire her work so much. Now she’s written the most incredible book, Victoria the Queen: An Intimate Biography of the Woman Who Ruled an Empire, I’ve got my chance!

Don’t be fooled by the demure portrait of Victoria on the cover—here is a woman who reigned over a quarter of the world’s population at the height of her rule. (She also bore nine children and survived eight assassination attempts.) In Baird’s deft portrayal, Victoria lives, breathes, and struts before us in all her complexity, and so do her consorts, particularly her politically ambitious husband Prince Albert—and later her “Scottish stallion” and probable lover, John Brown. On a geopolitical level, Baird’s sweeping historical portrait also illuminates just how interconnected the European royal families were during this time—Victoria’s Belgian cousin, King Leopold II, perpetrated genocide in the Congo while her German nephew, Kaiser Wilhelm II, would go on to initiate World War I. Historical astuteness aside, the pages gallop along enhanced by titillating morsels of info—like a certain Prime Minister’s predilection for whipping, in and out of the bedroom.

I hope this conversation gives you a taste of just how compelling Queen Victoria is as a subject, and most of all, how fabulous a story teller and biographer Julia is. Please let us know what you think of the conversation @litupshow & @bairdjulia on Twitter.

xoxox Angie

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Buy Victoria the Queen: An Intimate Biography of the Woman Who Ruled an Empire here

Julia Baird a journalist, broadcaster and author based in Sydney, Australia. She hosts The Drum on ABCTV and writes columns for the Sydney Morning Herald and the International New York Times. Her writing has appeared in a range of publications including Newsweek, The New York Times, The Philadelphia Inquirer, the Guardian, the Good Weekend, The Sydney Morning Herald, the Sun-Herald, The Monthly and Harper’s Bazaar.

Baird was based in the USA until 2011, working at Newsweek as columnist and deputy editor. She began work at the magazine as senior editor for Science, Society and Ideas. She edited and wrote cover stories on subjects including human evolution, the history of climate change denial, the mysterious lives of surrogate mothers, the politics of transgender, the significance of 1968, and the then vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin, as well as a profile of MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow. In 2010 she moved with her family to Philadelphia and worked as a columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Baird began her career in journalism at the Sydney Morning Herald, where she worked as a columnist, oped editor, education reporter and election editor. In 2006 and again at the end of 2011 she was the host of the in depth interview radio program “Sunday Profile” on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. In 2012, she covered the US presidential campaign in Iowa for The Monthly, the ABC, and the Sun-Herald.

In 2005, Baird was a fellow at the Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press and Public Policy at Harvard, researching the global response to American opinion in the lead-up to the Iraq War. Her Ph.D., on female politicians and the press, formed the basis of her book, Media Tarts: How the Australian Press Frames Female Politicians (2004). Baird has also taught history (20th century cultural history and personal narratives, involving the study of letters, diaries and journals), and made radio documentaries on subjects as diverse as black metal music and convent education.

Baird received both her B.A. and Ph.D. in history from Sydney University. She is a regular commentator on television and radio. She has also become expert in making play-doh, bug catchers and brownies for her two little kids, and lives near the sea, which she swims in as long and often as she can.

Episode 83: Siri Hustvedt on Art, Feminism, Psychology & the Mind/Body Conundrum

Episode 83: Siri Hustvedt on Art, Feminism, Psychology & the Mind/Body Conundrum

LISTEN to Siri Hustvedt on the pod HERE. For many years I’ve read Siri Hustvedt’s work and marveled at her intelligence. The breadth of her knowledge–of the sciences, arts and literature– is mind boggling. Now, she shares another example of her genius with the world; […]

Episode 82: David Szalay on “All That Man Is”

Episode 82: David Szalay on “All That Man Is”

Listen to David Szalay HERE. I often talk to women, but this week I reversed the trend and spoke to a man about the experience of being a man. A truly original idea! The man is David Szalay. His book, All That Man Is, shortlisted for the […]

Episode 81: Jade Chang on Times of Social Upheaval and the American Dream

Episode 81: Jade Chang on Times of Social Upheaval and the American Dream

LISTEN TO JADE CHANG HERE.

There may not have been a more positive presence in the Lit Up studio than that of Jade Chang. It’s little wonder that she’s the author of the astute, funny, and sharp novel, The Wangs vs. the World, a road trip romp about the Wangs, a Chinese American family who’ve lost their cosmetics empire fortune. The mischievous patriarch Charles, Barbra his second wife, and Charles’s three children; Sina, a disgraced art world wunderkind; Andrew, an aspiring stand up comic; and high school fashion blogger, Grace; must cross the country redefine what the American dream means to them.

Jade’s book prompted so many threads of conversation, from her own family’s history to the state of politics in America. My time with Jade lifted my spirits and I hope it lifts yours too.

Follow Jade on Twitter @thejadechang and Lit Up @litupshow on Twitter & Instagram.

xox Angie

 

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Buy The Wangs Vs. the World at Barnes & Noble, Amazon, or better yet at your local independent bookstore.

Jade Chang has covered arts and culture as a journalist and editor. She is the recipient of a Sundance Fellowship for Arts Journalism, the AIGA/Winterhouse Award for Design Criticism, and the James D. Houston Memorial scholarship from the Squaw Valley Community of Writers. The Wangs vs. the World is her debut novel. She lives in Los Angeles.

Episode 80: Trevor Noah on Being Born a Crime

Episode 80: Trevor Noah on Being Born a Crime

LISTEN TO TREVOR NOAH HERE. Riveting. Humble. Inspiring. This is how I would describe comedian, writer, and host of The Daily Show, Trevor Noah. This week he joined me at NeueHouse, in New York, for an intimate conversation about his memoir Born a Crime, which should be required reading […]

Trevor Noah Reveals All

Trevor Noah Reveals All

Trevor Noah on Born a Crime Wednesday Nov. 16 @ NeueHouse As host of The Daily Show, Trevor Noah is one of the world’s brightest voices, and provides viewers in America and around the globe with their nightly dose of biting satire. With his new […]

Episode 77: Brit Bennett On Secrets & The Decisions That Shape Us

Episode 77: Brit Bennett On Secrets & The Decisions That Shape Us

Listen HERE.

It’s not often that a book gets as much buzz as Brit Bennett’s, The Mothers, and wholeheartedly delivers. Brit’s breakout novel eloquently dives head-on into taboo topics like religion and black motherhood, and explores how we’re shaped by certain pivotal decisions more than others. Set in a Southern Californian beach town (similar to where Brit grew up), the story revolves around a complicated love triangle between Nadia, Aubrey, and Luke–one that’s fueled by secrets and passionate longings. Along the way, we’re accompanied by a Greek-style chorus of gossipy elder church women who pipe in with judgmental comments and I-told-you-so quips as the novel progresses. I raced through this book and saw myself in all three main characters, making for some necessary reflection.

Please share this lovely conversation. you can follow us @litupshow on Twitter and Instagram and you can find Brit on Twitter @Britrbennett.

xo Angie

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Buy The Mothers at your local independent bookstore, or here on Amazon.

Cover photo credit: Chantal Anderson, Vogue, October 2016

Episode 75: Maria Semple on her Witchy Powers, 90201, and Adapting to Seattle

Episode 75: Maria Semple on her Witchy Powers, 90201, and Adapting to Seattle

Listen here!  “Today will be different,” Maria Semple‘s latest novel, begins the way we might hope to begin a new day, with the words: “Today I will be present. Today, anyone I’m speaking to, I will look them in the eye and listen deeply. . . . […]

Episode 74: Anuradha Roy on Womanhood in India

Episode 74: Anuradha Roy on Womanhood in India

  Immerse yourself in the life of a young documentarian searching for her roots in a seaside Indian pilgrim town in Sleeping on Jupiter, Anuradha Roy’s most recent novel about the legacy of war and the state of womanhood in India. One of the pleasures of […]

Episode 73: Emma Donoghue on Fasting, Fairies, and More

Episode 73: Emma Donoghue on Fasting, Fairies, and More

 

This week we have Emma Donoghue on the show to talk about her latest novel, The Wonder. She’s the author of five story collections and eight other novels, including Room (2010), which was shortlisted for the Man Booker prize and adapted, with a screenplay by Donoghue, into last year’s Academy Award-winning film.

In The Wonder, a small Irish village is mystified by a little girl who refuses to eat. Anna O’Donnell says she’s being kept alive by her faith in God. In this conversation we hear about the fasting girls from history that inspired Emma’s book, the fairies that inhabit the Irish countryside, and more.

You can read Stephen King’s New York Times review of The Wonder here.

Enjoy!

Angie

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Buy The Wonder at Barnes & Noble, Amazon, or at your local independent book store.

 

 

 

Episode 72: Jessica Bennett & Aminatou Sow on Fighting Sexism & the Patriarchy at Work

Episode 72: Jessica Bennett & Aminatou Sow on Fighting Sexism & the Patriarchy at Work

  This week we recorded live from NeueHouse Madison Square with award-winning journalist and critic Jessica Bennett, and consultant and co-host of the podcast Call Your Girlfriend, Aminatou Sow. We gathered to talk about Jessica’s new book Feminist Fight Club, an incisive guide to navigating subtle sexism at […]

Episode 71: Ann Patchett on Step Families, and Lasting Bonds

Episode 71: Ann Patchett on Step Families, and Lasting Bonds

Bestselling author—winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award and the Orange Prize—Ann Patchett delights us with stories from her childhood, the inspiration for her new novel Commonwealth. Spanning five decades, Commonwealth explores how a chance encounter at a Sunday afternoon, gin-fueled party, reverberates through the lives of […]

Episode 70: Revisting Mary-Louise Parker on Men and Motherhood

Episode 70: Revisting Mary-Louise Parker on Men and Motherhood

 

We’re republishing one of our favorite interviews, with actress and writer Mary-Louise Parker. If you missed it the first time, I hope you’ll take a listen now. As many of you know, Mary-Louise is the Tony, Emmy, and Golden Globe award-winning actress and writer of the exceptional memoir-in-letters, Dear Mr. You. It was such a pleasure to have such an open and honest conversation with someone I admire so much. Dear Mr. You was a revelation for me. I cried so many times while reading it – not because I was upset – more because Mary-Louise hit on truths that I hadn’t had words for before. I cannot recommend this book enough.

Check out The New York Times review Mary-Louise Parker’s ‘Dear Mr. You’ by one of our other favorite guests, Kate Bolick.

I’ll be back next week, September 13th, with literary legend Ann Patchett.

xoxo Angie

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Buy ‘Dear Mr. You’ on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or at your local independent bookstore.

Episode 69: Steph Opitz and Rachel Fershleiser on Summer Reads

Episode 69: Steph Opitz and Rachel Fershleiser on Summer Reads

This week we decided to switch it up and have two of our favorite literary professionals share their favorite books of the season. Steph Opitz is the books reviewer for Marie Claire magazine and celebrates books via work with the Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP) and the […]

Episode 68: Colson Whitehead on The Underground Railroad

Episode 68: Colson Whitehead on The Underground Railroad

Our guest this week is Colson Whitehead. His latest novel, The Underground Railroad, chronicles a young slave’s adventures, from the hellish Georgia plantation where she is born, through many treacherous Southern states with varying barbaric laws, towards freedom in the north. This is an extraordinary, brutal, and […]

Episode 67: Nadja Spiegleman on mother daughter relationships & family legacy

Episode 67: Nadja Spiegleman on mother daughter relationships & family legacy

 

This week our guest Nadja Spiegleman takes us deep into her family history. Be warned; her revelations are sure to spark some of your own. Nadja’s memoir, “I’m Supposed To Protect You From All This” is a riveting examination of the interconnected nature and intensity of the relationships between the women in her family–including herself, her French mother Françoise Mouly (art editor of The New Yorker), her grandmother and great grandmother. This insightful book is all about the extent to which we fight to be free of our parents, and yet, how we are inextricably pulled back into their orbit and influenced by their struggles, even if we know little about them.

Nadja’s father is the Pulitzer Prize–winning cartoonist Art Spiegelman, whose graphic memoir, Maus, is based on interviews with his Holocaust survivor father. The book is dedicated to Nadja. Nadja is also the author of a trio of graphic novels for children.

This conversation was an absolute favorite. Happy listening!

xox Angie

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Episode 66: Jessi Klein on Facing Fear, Speaking Up & Modern Femininity

Episode 66: Jessi Klein on Facing Fear, Speaking Up & Modern Femininity

Jessi Klein has been making us laugh and challenging our ideas about womanhood, feminism, and issues like age-ism, gun control, and online harassment as the head writer and executive producer of Comedy Central’s Inside Amy Schumer for years.  Now, you can get 100% pure Klein in […]

Episode 65: Jay McInerney on his Heady Early NY Years & “Bright, Precious Days”

Episode 65: Jay McInerney on his Heady Early NY Years & “Bright, Precious Days”

For those of us who ever dreamed of living in New York City, Jay McInerney’s cult sensation “Bright Lights, Big City” fueled and formed our impressions of the city. Particularly the possibility of bumping into our literary heroes and partying with them until the wee […]

Episode 64: Nicole Dennis-Benn and BuzzFeed’s Annie Daly on the Real Jamaica

Episode 64: Nicole Dennis-Benn and BuzzFeed’s Annie Daly on the Real Jamaica

Our guests this week are novelist Nicole Dennis-Benn and BuzzFeed Travel Editor Annie Daly. Together, we talk about Nicole’s debut novel “Here Comes the Sun,” a riveting look at the Jamaica beyond the pristine beaches and resorts that cater to foreigners. The novel closely examines the lives of four women, each grappling with the sacrifices they’ve made for the promise of a better life. Nicole was born and raised in Kingston, Jamaica, and the book hums with local voices–characters so unique, they’ve not been seen or heard in fiction until now.

I decided to have Annie join in the conversation not only because she is Jamaica obsessed, but also because her writing shapes ideas and perceptions about travel and places.

Please let us know what you think of this conversation on Twitter @litupshow and Instagram @litupshow 

xoxox Angie

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Buy “Here Comes the Sun” on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or at your local independent book store.

 

 

 

Episode 63: Stephanie Danler on coming of age in NYC, food culture, and lessons learned

Episode 63: Stephanie Danler on coming of age in NYC, food culture, and lessons learned

Not since Anthony Bourdain’s “Kitchen Confidential” and Gabrielle Hamilton’s “Blood, Bones and Butter” has there been a more hotly anticipated book set in the restaurant world than Stephanie Danler‘s debut novel, “Sweetbitter.” And, boy, does it deliver. The story swirls and crashes around its central […]

Episode 61: Revisiting the Genius of Ruth Bader Ginsburg Through Irin Carmon

Episode 61: Revisiting the Genius of Ruth Bader Ginsburg Through Irin Carmon

With all the controversy surrounding the Supreme Court and the upcoming election and the landmark opinion written by Justice Stephen Breyer last week that struck down a Texas law that would have closed all but nine abortion clinics in the state–supported by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg–it seemed […]

Episode 60: Arianna Huffington on the Science of Sleep

Episode 60: Arianna Huffington on the Science of Sleep

This week Arianna Huffington brings her warmth, wit and wisdom to the show. It was an honor hear about her life–from growing up in Athens, to Cambridge at sixteen, to moving to New York and founding one of the most powerful media companies in the world. She reveals her “wake up call” moment–when she was forced to radically change her lifestyle or face debilitating exhaustion. She discovered that prioritizing sleep would become one of the most radical acts of her life. In her book, The Sleep Revolution: Transforming Your Life, One Night At A Time, she chronicles her journey, touching on the science of sleep, the industrial revolution, sex, the power of dreams, and much more. Reading this book will give you concrete ways to reduce stress, combat anxiety, and reclaim the night. Our conversation also touches on some politics–how could I not ask Arianna about Trump?! I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did and that it inspires you to go to bed a little earlier tonight.

Please let us know what you think on Twitter and Instagram @litupshow and @ariannahuff.

xoxox Angie

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Buy The Sleep Revolution: Transforming Your Life, One Night At A Time on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or at your local independent bookstore.

Arianna Huffington is the co-founder, president, and editor-in-chief of the Huffington Post Media Group, the news and blog site that she launched in 2005. In 2012, the site won a Pulitzer Prize for national reporting.
She has been named one of the world’s most influential people by  Time Magazine and she’s graced Forbes Most Powerful Women list. Originally from Greece, she moved to England when she was 16 and graduated from Cambridge University with an M.A. in economics. At 21, she became president of the famed debating society, the Cambridge Union.
 She serves on numerous boards, including The Center for Public Integrity and Uber. Her 15th book, The Sleep Revolution: Transforming Your Life, One Night At A Time, on the science, history and mystery of sleep, was published in April and became an instant New York Times Bestseller.

Episode 59: Max Porter on the Realities of Grief

Episode 59: Max Porter on the Realities of Grief

Sometimes a book comes along and knocks you off kilter–revealing your fears and longings–reminding you how to love and live better. Grief Is the Thing with Feathers by Max Porter is one such book. This astonishing, rowdy, rude, and brilliant novel dramatizes one family’s experience of mourning with […]

Episode 58: Yaa Gyasi on Slavery and its Haunting Legacy

Episode 58: Yaa Gyasi on Slavery and its Haunting Legacy

This week’s guest Yaa Gyasi is being called the next Toni Morrison. Her debut novel, Homegoing–praised by Ta-Nehisi Coates–is set to start conversations at home and abroad. The story spans three centuries and follows two branches of a family tree beginning with half-sisters Effia and […]

Episode 57: Jessica Valenti on How Sexism & Misogyny Negatively Shapes Womens’ Lives

Episode 57: Jessica Valenti on How Sexism & Misogyny Negatively Shapes Womens’ Lives

Jessica Valenti has been fighting against misogyny and sexism, bravely paving the way for women online ever since she founded Feministing.com. In her memoir Sex Object, out today, she reveals how decades of harassment has shaped who she is today. In this week’s episode she talks about growing up in NYC, dealing with internet trolls, date rape, and why it is important to acknowledge that sexism is still negatively shaping the contemporary female experience.

We both hope this conversation sparks many more as you’re inspired to share your stories. Please let us know what issues resonate with you most. We are on twitter and Instagram @litupshow and you can find Jessica @JessicaValenti on both too. Also be sure to read Jessica’s New York Times piece, What Does a Lifetime of Leers Do to Us? here.

xox Angie

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Buy Sex Object on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or at your local independent bookstore.

Episode 56: Revisiting the Wisdom of Lidia Yuknavitch

Episode 56: Revisiting the Wisdom of Lidia Yuknavitch

I hope everyone had a lovely long weekend. This week we revisit one of our most loved episodes of last year with the incomparable Lidia Yuknavitch. Since the episode aired, we’ve had so much positive feedback, so if you missed it then, I suggest taking a […]

Episode 55: Geoff Dyer on the Lure of Travel, Art & the Power of Place

Episode 55: Geoff Dyer on the Lure of Travel, Art & the Power of Place

I’ve read Geoff Dyer‘s work for years, so getting to talk to him in person about his work this week was an honor and a treat. One thing I didn’t expect when I started reading his most recent book–a series of fiction and non fiction […]

Episode 54: Lindy West On Living with Pride

Episode 54: Lindy West On Living with Pride

Whether this week’s guest Lindy West is taking a stance on victim-targeting rape jokes, misogyny in the comedy world or defending her place in the world as a fat woman, her words are always sharp, brilliant and ever so witty. Furthermore, she is willing to speak out about issues that affect all women, even when it comes at great personal cost–think Internet trolls who’ve made it their mission to disrupt her life. In her memoir Shrill – Notes From a Loud Woman she reveals all and her glorious self shines through as it does in this interview.

If you enjoy what you hear or want to add to the conversation please let us know @LitUpShow and @thlindywest on Twitter.

xoxox Angie

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Buy Shrill on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or at your local independent bookstore.

Lindy West is a columnist at The Guardian, and a contributor to This American Life. Her work has appeared in the New York TimesCosmopolitan, GQVultureJezebel, The Stranger, and others. Her writing focuses on feminist polemics, social justice, body image, and more. She is the founder of I Believe You, It’s Not Your Fault, an advice blog for teens, as well as the reproductive rights destigmatization campaign #ShoutYourAbortion.

Episode 53: Kate Tempest on Evolving through Form

Episode 53: Kate Tempest on Evolving through Form

This week our guest is the British poet, playwright, and spoken-word performer Kate Tempest. She’s a force to be reckoned with — her talents are so plentiful and her intellect so sharp, that I’m sure you’ll be hanging on her every word, just like I […]

Episode 52: Molly Prentiss on Artistic Ambition & New York Stories

Episode 52: Molly Prentiss on Artistic Ambition & New York Stories

This week Molly Prentiss and I talk about her buzz-worthy debut novel “Tuesday Nights in 1980.” This book is the ultimate absorbing read. Prepare to be swiftly transported to the downtown art scene of New York, packed with renegade artists, ambitious critics, and opportunistic curators […]

Episode 51: Maggie Nelson on Gender, Sexuality, and Beyond

In the introduction to this week’s show, I say that Maggie Nelson is one of the most electrifying writers at work today. It’s worth mentioning this again, because it’s true! Her writing defies, blends, and bends genres. Reading it makes me question why we’re so obsessed with classifying art into categories–this will be a recurring theme in the conversation, in regards to classifying people too. Maggie’s writing exists outside the world of stodgy literary rules and conventions and soars because of it, and hopefully we are nearing a place where people are accepted and celebrated for the same reasons. I was so nervous to speak with Maggie because I respect her so much, and I tripped up a lot! But, Maggie was so kind and gracious that we had some laughs too.

Like Maggie’s work, we go many places. She clarifies how her partner, the artist Harry Dodge is fluidly gendered and what that means. We discuss the murder of Maggie’s aunt and how it’s affected her life and work. And, I share an experience that I thought I’d buried long ago. It was a honor to have Maggie in the studio. Please share what touched or interested you about this episode @litupshow on Twitter and Instagram. I also suggest reading Hilton Al’s excellent profile of Maggie in The New Yorker, “Immediate Family.”

xoxox Angie

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Buy The Red Parts on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or at your local independent bookstore. Buy The Argonauts too on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, etc.

Maggie Nelson is the author of the book length lyric essay Bluets. This month Graywolf is reissuing her memoir “The Red Parts” (first published in 2007) which focusses on the aftermath of the 1969 murder of Nelson’s aunt and the trial, thirty-six years later, of a suspect in the case. Nelson is also the author of “The Argonauts,” an account of Nelson’s relationship with her fluidly gendered partner the artist Harry Dodge and her pregnancy with their child Iggy. She is also the author of several books of poetry, including Jane: A Murder, and several books of criticism including “Women, the New York School, and Other True Abstractions” and “The Art of Cruelty”. She’s been awarded, among other prizes, both a Guggenheim and an NEA fellowship.

Lead image of Maggie Courtesy The New Yorker taken by Graeme Mitchell. 

Episode 50: Padma Lakshmi on Love, Loss, and What We Ate

Episode 50: Padma Lakshmi on Love, Loss, and What We Ate

This week’s episode is guaranteed to inspire. My guest is the one and only Padma Lakshmi. I was lucky enough to record with her last week at Soho House in New York to celebrate her memoir “Love, Loss, and What We Ate.” In it she […]

Episode 49: Matt Gallagher on War, Coming Home & Life After Combat

  This week I sat down with former US Army Captain Matt Gallagher to talk about his debut novel Young Blood. I have to admit, I’m not routinely drawn to contemporary war novels, but when a friend suggested I read this book (and I began to […]

Episode 48: Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney on Relishing Dysfunctional Families

This week, our guest Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney brings us her scandalous and sexy debut novel, “The Nest,” a comedy about greed, family rifts and money anxiety in New York City. The adult Plumb siblings Leo, Jack, Melody and Beatrice have built their adult lives on the promise of a trust fund “The Nest” set up by their late father. Each was set to inherit a hefty sum when the youngest daughter Melody turned forty, but when the handsome and reckless Leo Plumb abandons his wife at a party, seduces a teenage waitress and totals his car during a sex act. Medical bills, legal fees and hush money effectively drain the nest. This is where we start the book… from this description I’m sure you can already tell how much fun it is to read. In our conversation Cynthia reveals why she finally committed to the writing life, how her years living in New York informed the novel, and so much more.

We hope you enjoy the show the show! Let us know @litupshow on Twitter and Instagram. 

XO Angie

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Buy “The Nest” on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or at your local independent bookstore.

Episode 47: Karan Mahajan on Living with Global Terrorism

Karan Mahajan‘s novel “The Association of Small Bombs” is, put simply, excellent. It’s devastating, sharp and tender. In it, Karan explores the disintegration of the lives of both Hindus and Muslims affected by a bomb blast at Lajpat Market in Delhi in 1996. Karan and I […]

Episode 46: Melissa Broder & Karolina Waclawiak on So Sad Today

This week we get up close and personal with two of the most exciting voices of today; Melissa Broder and Karolina Waclawiak. Melissa Broder is a poet, author of the collection of essays “So Sad Today,” a Twitter guru and a monthly horoscope columnist for Lenny Letter. Karolina […]

Episode 45: Alec Ross on Innovation, Cyber Weaponry, and Robots!

Get ready for a conversation that will get you thinking (or in my case, freaking out) about the future.

Globalization and the Internet have had a world-changing impact on markets and businesses over the last two decades. The question now is: What comes next? This week, Secretary Hillary Clinton’s former senior advisor for innovation, Alec Ross joins me and my special co-host Marcus BaramFast Company’s Senior News Editor to discuss Alec’s new book The Industries of the Future.  Alec, Marcus and I had so much fun, maybe a little too much. You’ll hear that our microphones couldn’t handle it at some points – we recorded this live at Soho house so please excuse any sound interference.

This week should definitely prompt some interesting conversations at home – let us know what issues got to you the most @litupshow on Twitter and Instagram. We love hearing from you.

xoxox Angie

Alec Ross, author of THE INDUSTRIES OF THE FUTURE, is one of America’s leading experts on innovation. For four years he served as Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s senior advisor for innovation, and in that role traveled more than half a million miles to 41 countries, including some of the toughest places on earth: Haiti, the war zones of Syria, and the cartel-controlled border towns in northern Mexico, to name a few. He was also exposed to the highest levels of leadership in the biggest technology companies and governments around the world. This four-year immersion traveling the globe gave him unique insight into the changing nature of innovation. From phone-charger stands in eastern Congo to R&D labs in South Korea, Ross had the chance to see many of the technologies that await us in the coming years.

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Buy The Industries of the Future on Amazon, Barnes & Noble or at your local independent bookstore.

Marcus Baram has worked as an editor at the New York Observer, The Wall Street Journal, and the Huffington Post. He has written and reported for the New York Daily News, ABC News, the New York Times, the New Yorker, New York magazine, and the Village Voice. He’s also the author of the critically-acclaimed biography “Pieces of a Man: Gil Scott-Heron,” has waited on tables, bartended, deejayed at nightclubs, driven an ice cream truck and taught elementary school.

Marcus Baram

I’d also like to thank Paris-based, composer and bassist, Marc Marder, for our new, elegant and ever so sexy, intro music. You’ll get a hint of his immense talent in this brief opening snippet, but you can find more about his celebrated film scores, theater music and concert pieces here. Theme music by Marc Marder ©2016.

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Photo credit ©Matt Dine

Episode 44: Hannah Tennant-Moore On Lust, Rage and Finding Buddhism

  Welcome to this week’s episode! I’d like to thank Paris-based, composer and bassist, Marc Marder, for our new, elegant and ever so sexy, intro music. You’ll get a hint of his immense talent in this brief opening snippet, but you can find more about his celebrated […]

Episode 43: Style Icon Garance Doré On Ditching Perfection and Getting On With it!

In the world of fashion Garance Doré needs no introduction – she is, perhaps, the most beloved style icon of today – stylish because she is both elegant and kind. Since starting her namesake blog ten years ago she has amassed a huge cult following, in part because of […]

Episode 42: Maria Konnikova on the Psychology of Crafty Con Artists

From the moment this week’s conversation starts with journalist and psychologist Maria Konnikova, author (most-recently) of The Confidence Game: Why We Fall For It…Every Time, you’ll be captivated by her enthusiasm for the criminal mind. Join us as we chat about the cunning antics of the world’s most notorious cheats, swindlers and con men. Have you ever been conned? Well, I have and you’ll hear all about it here. It wasn’t my finest moment 🙂

We also switch gears and talk about Maria’s research into sleep. Do you press that snooze button like me? If so, you had better read Snoozers Are, in Fact, Losers. Oof!

You can check some of Maria’s other articles here.

Let us know what you think of this episode @litupshow on Twitter and Instagram.

xoxox Angie

Buy The Confidence Game on Amazon, Barnes & Noble or at your local independent book store.

Maria

Maria is a contributing writer for The New Yorker, where she writes a regular column with a focus on psychology and culture, and is currently working on an assortment of non-fiction and fiction projects. Her first book, Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes (Viking/Penguin, 2013), was a New York Times bestseller and has been translated into eighteen languages. It was nominated for the Agatha Award and the Anthony Award for Best Non-fiction and was a Goodreads People’s Choice Semifinalist for 2013. Her writing has appeared online and in print in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New York Times, Slate, California Sunday, Pacific Standard, The New Republic, The Paris Review, The Wall Street Journal, Salon, The Boston Globe, The Observer, Scientific American MIND, WIRED, and Scientific American, among numerous other publications. Maria is a recipient of the 2015 Harvard Medical School Media Fellowship, and is a Schachter Writing Fellow at Columbia University’s Motivation Science Center. She formerly wrote the “Literally Psyched” column for Scientific American and the popular psychology blog “Artful Choice” for Big Think. She graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University, where she studied psychology, creative writing, and government, and received her Ph.D. in Psychology from Columbia University. She previously worked as a producer for the Charlie Rose show on PBS.

Episode 41: The Revelatory Mary-Louise Parker

Our guest this week is Mary-Louise Parker; the Tony, Emmy, and Golden Globe award-winning actress and writer of the exceptional memoir-in-letters, Dear Mr. You. It would be an understatement to say I was nervous for this interview – there were breathing exercises happening moments before she walked in […]

Episode 40: Alexander Chee on the Power of the 19th Century Parisian Courtesan

This week we go on a sumptuous and extravagant journey back in time to Second Empire Paris with Alexander Chee. We were lucky enough to record this conversation live at Soho House in New York.  It was the perfect setting to celebrate Alex’s epic novel The Queen of […]

Episode 39: Helen Ellis – Writer, Poker Player and Housewife Extraordinaire

This week’s conversation with writer, professional poker player and all-round Southern belle, Helen Ellis, author of the sardonic, brilliant and sharp-witted collection of stories American Housewife, may have you longing for a mint julep, or perhaps, more importantly, an expert bra fitter of your own – in my case it was both (and the plight of my bosoms will never be the same).

As you will hear, Helen’s life is as eclectic as her intriguing stories that feature manic reality TV thrifting shows, murderous Manhattanites, chardonnay-swilling bookclubbers, and so much more.

Check out this great piece in The New York TimesThe Real Housewife of New York (Who Happens to Be a Poker Star) by fellow author J. Courtney Sullivan.

XOXOX Angie

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You can buy American Housewife at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or at your local independent book store. Helen is also the author of Eating the Cheshire Cat.

Episode 38: Sunil Yapa on Action Through Empathy

Our guest this week Sunil Yapa talks about his first novel Your Heart Is a Muscle the Size of a Fist, which takes place on one cold November day at the 1999 The World Trade Organization protests in Seattle. There couldn’t be a more timely […]

Episode 37: ‘Spotlight’ Screenwriter Josh Singer & Journalist Megan Twohey on the Complexity of Truth

This week we have two exceptional guests to kick off 2016. Josh Singer, the co-screenwriter (with director Tom McCarthy) of the award-winning film “Spotlight“, based on The Boston Globe’s 2003 Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church; and Reuters investigative journalist Megan Twohey, a 2014 Pulitzer-prize finalist for […]

Episode 36: Steve Toltz on resilience and human nature

 

This week I was lucky enough to speak with fellow Aussie writer Steve Toltz, author of the highly acclaimed and universally loved, A Fraction of the Whole, shortlisted for the Booker Prize and the 2008 Guardian First Book Award. His new novel Quicksand is as wonderfully deranged as his first. The book’s protagonist, failed get-rich-quick entrepreneur Aldo Benjamin, accused of murder, is one of the most darkly comic characters in fiction. He’s guaranteed to have you laughing out loud and noting down his insightful life lessons. In this conversation you’ll also hear how Steve’s experience of being paralyzed while living in Paris, inspired parts of the book.

I hope you enjoy this conversation – especially the two Aussie accents! Let us know what you think on Instagram and Twitter @litupshow.

xoxoxox Angie

 

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Buy Quicksand at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or at your local independent bookstore. Also, go get A Fraction of the Whole now if you haven’t read it.

 

 

 

Episode 35: Stacy Schiff Unpacks the Hysteria of the Salem Witch Trials

This week’s guest is the formidable Stacy Schiff. She’s the author of Véra (Mrs. Vladimir Nabokov) for which she won the Pulitzer Prize; Saint-Exupéry, a Pulitzer Prize finalist; and A Great Improvisation: Franklin, France, and the Birth of America, and Cleopatra: A Life. Her latest book, The Witches: […]

Episode 34: Lauren Redniss on unearthing unique stories and the challenges of climate change

  I have been following Lauren Redniss‘s work for many years. When a friend suggested I get her second book, Radioactive: Marie & Pierre Curie, A Tale of Love and Fallout, after it was a finalist for the 2011 National Book Award, I snapped it up right […]

Episode 33: Molly Crabapple on The Paris Attacks, Refugees, Her Art and witness journalism

This week I’m joined by artist, writer and activist Molly Crabapple to talk about her memoir Drawing Blood. It’s as visceral as the title suggests—there is so little separating her wild heart from the page, that her words (and illustrations), bursting with passion, will ignite the adventurer and activist in you.

Here we talk about the state of the world at large, her work with Syrian refugees, her reporting at Guantanamo, the time she questioned Trump about the labor camps of Abu Dhabi, and most recently the terrorist attacks in Paris, Beirut and Mali. We also touch upon her sex worker activism, her relationship with her body and feminism. Drawing Blood is out December 1st so preorder it now.

Molly is such an impressive human. I hope you’ll be as inspired by her as I am. Let us know what you think on Twitter @litupshow.

xoxo Angie

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Pre-order your copy today at Indiebound, Amazon, or Barnes and Noble.

Molly Crabapple is an artist and writer in New York. Her memoir, Drawing Blood, will be published by HarperCollins in December 2015. Called “An emblem of the way art can break out of the gilded gallery” by the New Republic, she has drawn in Guantanamo Bay, Abu Dhabi’s migrant labor camps, and with rebels in Syria. Crabapple is a contributing editor for VICE, and has written for publications including The New York Times, Paris Review, and Vanity Fair. Her work is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art.

 

 

Episode 32: Alex Mar on Modern Witchcraft in America

When I hear the word “witches” I think of Salem, black cats and broomsticks. But according to our guest this week, Alex Mar, the real life world of witches couldn’t be farther from those storybook images. Her gripping book, Witches of America, explores not only modern-day, nature-worshipping witchcraft, but […]

Episode 31: Mary Gaitskill on Horses, Love, and Rihanna

Having Mary Gaitskill on the show this week was a dream come true—sorry for the cliché—but there’s no other way to say it. The Mare, her follow up to the National Book Award–nominated Veronica, may be her most poignant work yet. I’m always amazed when I […]

Our First Live! Episode at the Soho House with Bill Clegg

This week’s show is our first live recording from the Soho House in New York! I was so excited to kick off the Lit Up Literary Salon with NY-based writer and renowned literary agent, Bill Clegg. His novel Did You Ever Have a Family is a heartbreaking book for sure, but does a masterful job of showing the resilience of the human spirit. It begins with a catastrophic tragedy that obliterates four people on the eve of a wedding, leaving the inhabitants of a small Connecticut town reeling. As readers, we are taken on a journey through the characters eyes and hearts, which ultimately shows hope after an unfathomable devastation. It’s no surprise that the book was nominated for both the Man Booker Prize and The National Book Award.

While I love the intimateness we get when it’s just a couple of us in a room recording, the energy of a live audience and their questions was a really special experience, which I think you’ll hear in this episode.  I’m currently scheduling our next live episode, also at Soho House, for January. If you’re a member, we’d love to see you there, but we do plan on doing more live conversations in the future!  If there is anyone YOU’D like to hear from, tweet me at @litupshow with suggestions or leave a note in the comments below!

XO Angie

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Buy Did You Ever Have a Family on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or at your local independent bookstore here. Bill is also the author of two captivating memoirs; 90 Days and Portrait of an Addict as a Young Man.

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Episode 29: Irin Carmon on Notorious RBG Fighting for Equality

As soon as I heard that MSNBC journalist, Irin Carmon, and Shana Knizhnik, creator of the Internet sensation Notorious RBG Tumblr planned to co-author a book about the formidable Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, I was relentless in my goal to get one of them on the show! Apparently […]

Episode 2: Hanya Yanagihara on Adulthood and Its Many Variations

Episode 2: Hanya Yanagihara on Adulthood and Its Many Variations

  What a week. After many, many months of (admittedly very fun) preparation, Lit Up is here. Thank you for listening and for helping launch our pod into the world. With your help we made it onto the iTunes New & Noteworthy list, hurrah! We […]


My Diary

Episode 31: Mary Gaitskill on Horses, Love, and Rihanna

Having Mary Gaitskill on the show this week was a dream come true—sorry for the cliché—but there’s no other way to say it. The Mare, her follow up to the National Book Award–nominated Veronica, may be her most poignant work yet. I’m always amazed when I see writers who manage to one up themselves when they already are creating such important work.

While of course I’m partial to our interview, Parul Sehgal wrote another incredible piece, Mary Gaitskill and the Life Unseen, in The New York Times, which is definitely worth a read.

This is also our last episode with Emily. We’ve had the most incredible journey together up to this point and Lit Up could not have happened or developed this far without her. Make sure to listen to the very end of this one to hear in her own words what she’s up to next.

xo Angie

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Buy The Mare on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or at your local independent bookstore.


All Time Favorites

Padma Lakshmi on How Her Indian Heritage Influenced Her Career

Padma Lakshmi on How Her Indian Heritage Influenced Her Career

Here’s how she turned challenges–like moving to a new country, struggling to lose weight, and battling endometriosis–into opportunities. PHOTO: FLICKR USER ELLEN WALLOP, ASIA SOCIETY   It’s easy to look at Padma Lakshmi and think, here is a person made for the spotlight. But for […]

Ode to the Wing

Ode to the Wing

New York’s Chicest Women-Only Club In a matter of months, The Wing already has a 3000-strong waiting list. (lead image credit: Harper’s Bazaar) The pastel-hued Wing. Photo: Supplied Late last year, after a decade trying to make it in New York’s hectic media world, with a weekly […]

Episode 92: Daphne Merkin on Reckoning with Depression

Episode 92: Daphne Merkin on Reckoning with Depression

Listen to Daphne’s episode HERE. Daphne Merkin is one of my favorite people and she is hands down one of the best writers I’ve ever come across. This is one of my favorite episodes. Daphne is a former staff writer for The New Yorker and […]

Ayelet Waldman’s Unusual “Trip” & Favorite Books Revealed

Ayelet Waldman’s Unusual “Trip” & Favorite Books Revealed

Upcoming Lit Up podcast guest Ayelet Waldman was featured in The Sunday Book Review in the New York Times sharing her favorite books. Next week she’ll be on the show to talk about her most recent book,  A Really Good Day about micro dosing with LSD. Illustration […]

MARCH 23 BOOK LAUNCH: Alyssa Mastromonaco and I will chat about her years as Obama’s Deputy Chief of Staff and how to run an international media powerhouse!

MARCH 23 BOOK LAUNCH: Alyssa Mastromonaco and I will chat about her years as Obama’s Deputy Chief of Staff and how to run an international media powerhouse!

Thursday March 23rd 7-8PM at Neuehouse in New York, Alyssa Mastromonaco, A+E’s President of global communications strategy & talent, former Vice Media chief operating officer, and President Obama’s former deputy chief of staff, will talk about her upcoming book Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?: And […]