Tag: Lit Up Podcast

Caitlin Moran on How to be Famous

Caitlin Moran on How to be Famous

We are relaunching Lit Up with arguably the UK’s most formidable and funny feminist. I was lucky enough to visit Caitlin at her house in London to about her most recent book How to Be Famous. Listen to Caitlin Moran on iTunes pod here. Here’s […]

Episode 97: Alyssa Mastromonaco on her Heady Years as President Obama’s Deputy Chief of Staff

Episode 97: Alyssa Mastromonaco on her Heady Years as President Obama’s Deputy Chief of Staff

Listen to Alyssa Mastromonaco HERE. Subscribe on iTunes HERE. How does a fastidious IGA check-out chick and public school kid from upstate New York, with no connections and no Ivy League education, end up a few feet from the Oval Office, working as the youngest-ever […]

Episode 95: Ariel Levy on Life Before and After “Thanksgiving in Mongolia”

Episode 95: Ariel Levy on Life Before and After “Thanksgiving in Mongolia”

Listen to Ariel Levy on the podcast HERE.

This week’s guest is Ariel Levy, a self-described professional explorer. She’s crisscrossed the globe in search of these unique experiences as a staff writer for The New Yorker since 2008, and now turns her interrogative eye on herself. What results is profound, and lasting. Growing out of an essay called “Thanksgiving in Mongolia,” Rules Do Not Apply reveals what happens when nature decides to smash the plans you’ve made, and derail what you thought was your life.

This conversation is one I’ll remember all my life. I hope it resonates with you too.

xoxo Angie

 

Episode 94: Jami Attenberg On Being your Own Kind of Grown Up

Episode 94: Jami Attenberg On Being your Own Kind of Grown Up

Listen to Jami Attenberg HERE. Jami Attenberg is the best! I’ve been waiting to have her back on the show ever since Emily and I interviewed her about her last book Saint Mazie. As you will hear, All Grown Up, knocked me about and triggered […]

Episode 93: On the Korean Immigrant Experience in Japan

Episode 93: On the Korean Immigrant Experience in Japan

Listen to Jin Min Lee HERE.  I’m excited to celebrate International Women’s Day with my convo with writer Min Jin Lee, whose latest novel Pachinko is a stellar example of female resilience through the ages. Pachinko illuminates a period of history unknown to many of us – early […]

Episode 92: Daphne Merkin on Reckoning with Depression

Episode 92: Daphne Merkin on Reckoning with Depression

Listen to Daphne’s episode HERE.

Daphne Merkin is one of my favorite people and she is hands down one of the best writers I’ve ever come across. This is one of my favorite episodes. Daphne is a former staff writer for The New Yorker and a regular contributor to Elle Magazine — she’s written books and won prizes and now she shares her most personal story – about living with depression. This conversation, like the book, is not gloomy but fascinating and life affirming. It will also help you understand the people you love who live with depression. I adore Daphne and I feel lucky to call her a friend. Listen and you’ll soon see why.

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Buy This Close to Happy here.

Daphne Merkin is a former staff writer for The New Yorker and a regular contributor to Elle. Her writing frequently appears in The New York Times, Bookforum, Departures, Travel + Leisure, W, Vogue, Tablet Magazine, and other publications. Merkin has taught writing at the 92nd Street Y, Marymount College, and Hunter College. Her previous books include Enchantment, which won the Edward Lewis Wallant Award for best novel on a Jewish theme, and two collections of essays, Dreaming of Hitler and The Fame Lunches, which was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. She lives in New York City.

 

Image credit: Tablet Magazine

Episode 91: Alana Massey on the Cult of Celebrity & Being a Winona Vs a Gwyneth

Episode 91: Alana Massey on the Cult of Celebrity & Being a Winona Vs a Gwyneth

Listen to Alana Massey and Payton Costell Turner HERE. This week we bring you writer and cultural critic Alana Massey whose book of essays All The Lives I Want: Essays About My Best Friends Who Happen to be Strangers examines celebrity womanhood and how it shapes our […]

Episode 83: Siri Hustvedt on Art, Feminism, Psychology & the Mind/Body Conundrum

Episode 83: Siri Hustvedt on Art, Feminism, Psychology & the Mind/Body Conundrum

LISTEN to Siri Hustvedt on the pod HERE. For many years I’ve read Siri Hustvedt’s work and marveled at her intelligence. The breadth of her knowledge–of the sciences, arts and literature– is mind boggling. Now, she shares another example of her genius with the world; […]

Episode 82: David Szalay on “All That Man Is”

Episode 82: David Szalay on “All That Man Is”

Listen to David Szalay HERE.

I often talk to women, but this week I reversed the trend and spoke to a man about the experience of being a man. A truly original idea! The man is David Szalay. His book, All That Man Is, shortlisted for the Mann Booker Prize, is a collection of nine stories about men at different points in their lives, each struggling with what creates a meaningful life. The pros are vivid, arresting, and unsentimental, especially when covering terrain such as male desire, male failure, and the dreamlike (sometimes mundane) nature of being a human. For a cerebral analysis of the book, check out James Wood’s review in the New Yorker, Nine Tales of Crisis in “All That A Man Is” – David Szalay’s novel is bracingly unsentimental about male desire and male failure. (The cover illustration is by BJØRN LIE for the New Yorker and it accompanies this article.)

I thoroughly enjoyed this conversation with David and I hope you do too.

xoox Angie

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I had to include this dashing photo! Buy All that Man Is here.

Szalay (pronounced SOL-loy) was born in Montreal in 1974 to a Hungarian father and a Canadian mother. He grew up in London, was educated at Oxford, and currently lives in Budapest. He is the author of three previous novels, London and the South-EastThe Innocent, and Spring. In 2013, Granta named him one of its best young British novelists.